LIANZA HISTORY

LIANZA's history is long and illustrious. We've put together a time-line illustrating just how important our organisation has been (and still is) with the help of the research publications of W.J. McEldowney and Julia Millen.

1910
  • Library Association of New Zealand (LANZ) officially forms
1932
  • Carnegie Corporation injects funding for libraries
1936
  • NZLA Auckland branch established
1937
  • LANZ Journal, New Zealand libraries established
  • Munn-Barr report creates the foundations for the inter-loan system
  • NZLA Dunedin, Canterbury, and Wellington branches established
1938
  • Country Library Service established
1939
  • LANZA constitution rewritten
  • LANZ formally becomes NZLA to be recognised as an incorporated society, after the New Zealand Library Association Act is passed
1941
  • General library certificate syllabus approved
  • Children's librarians certificate course initiated
1942
  • School library service begins
  • Association's general training course established, later known as the NZLA library certificate
1944
  • Children's librarians certificate course initiated
1945
  • Esther Glen medal first awarded
  • Children's book week established
1946
  • NZ library school for graduates established
  • NZ library school diploma established
1951
  • Professional section of the NZLA set up
1952
  • The NZLA sets up the National Library committee
1955
  • Associateship (ANZLA) and Fellowship (FNZLA) awards established
1962
  • The Maori Library Services Committee (MSLC) is established
  • The Currie Comission on education in New Zealand comments on the low quality of school libraries.  In response to the report NZLA releases a four page pamphlet detailing the importance of school libraries
1963
  • The Library Public Relations Committee established
  • Prime Minister Keith Holyoake announces a decision to establish a national library
  • A one week course is initiated especially for teacher-librarians
  • The MLSC publishes a four page pamphlet encouraging the usage of libraries by Maori
1964
  • Mary Fleming award is established
  • Geoffrey Alley appointed as New Zealand's first national librarian
1965
  • National Library Act passed
  • Geoffrey Alley offers his services to the professional section
1966
  • NZ Libraries journal moves from 11 issues per year to 6
  • A study of professional and non-professional duties in libraries' published
1967
  • Geoffrey Alley retires as national librarian, succeeded by Hector Macaskill
  • NZLA Waikato branch established
  • The MLSC goes into recess
1969
  • Library and book week established
1970
  • James Traue assesses the NZLA and announces the imbalance of power within the organisation.  General consensus of membership is concern that Council is centred on Wellington
  • The International Writers organisation, PEN, discusses the question of whether authors should be compensated for their work being held within libraries
  • Working Party on Education for Librarianship (The Graham Report) is publicised
1971
  • James Traue appointed as convenor for the Committee on Future Organisations
  • The CFO commissions several studies and surveys for insight into members opinions
1972
  • First Maori Language day
1973
  • Election for position of president opposed for the first time
  • Composition of the council altered to accomodate the new chairpersons of specific branches
  • The Authors' Fund is created (Public Lending Right for New Zealand Authors)
  • Nelson Public Library, last of the large public libraries to move to the standard 'free and rental' system
1975
  • The executive officer position is formally created. The first individual elected is David H. Bowie
  • The NZLA publishes 'Library Services for Children in New Zealand Schools and Public Libraries
1976
  • Mary Ronnie appointed national librarian
1978
  • Library Life replaces the NZLA newsletter
1980
  • Feminist Librarians founded
  • NZLA branch newsletters begin to adopt titles / subtitles in te reo Maori
  • Council adopts the policies listed within the "Education for librarianship" statement
1983
  • A working party on interloan is established and performs a study on the current system
1984
  • Massey University publishes "Who's Who in Public Libraries"
  • The Joint Standing Committee on Interloan is established
1987
  • The National Library of New Zealand opens to the public
1989
  • The Futures Group is established
  • The Bicultural Committee is established
  • The NZLA rewrites the region boundaries to include more isolated librarians
1990
  • NZ Library School achieves university status whose qualifications are now internationally recognised
  • GT Alley Fellowship established
1991
  • The N-Strategy Steering Group commissions the 'Te Ara Tika - Guiding Voices' project, to investigate progressing biculturalism in the LIS sector
  • Individuals begin gathering to discuss the implementation of a nationally recognised set of Maori catalogue subject headings
1992
  • The NZLA commits to a restructure and is formally renamed The NZ Library and Information Association: Te Rau Herenga o Aotearoa Inc
1994
  • The N-Strategy action group alongside the NZLIA publishes 'Ka mahi tonu: biculturalism in New Zealand librarianship 1992 - 1994'
  • Library Life is renamed to 'Library Life: Te Rau Ora: Newsletter of New Zealand Library and Information Association Te Rau Herenga o Aotearoa'
1995
  • The NZLIA and Te Ropu Whakahau agree to a partnership
  • The NZLIA constitution is rewritten to reflect the partnership agreements
1996
  • The then NZLIA accountant signs an affidavit for the Fraud squad
  • The NZLIA gathers for an AGM to decide whether to close down or continue the organisation
  • A former NZLIA accountant is found to be guilty of embezzlement and is charged with paying reparations to the NZLIA
  • The JSCI revises the interloan system
1998
  • The council is recomprised to represent the changes to the region boundaries
  • The NZLIA is renamed to LIANZA: Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa: Te Rau Herenga o Aotearoa
2000
  • The Rau Rua Mano award is established
  • School Libraries Association of New Zealand Aotearoa (SLANZA) is established
  • Children's Literature Foundation of New Zealand
2003
  • The updated 'Public Library Standards' are released
2004
  • The Iwi Hapu names list is officially released
2006
  • LIANZA realises it is registered twice - once by Act of Parliament and once through the companies office.  This is addressed in a Special General Meeting with membership
2007
  • The Professional Registration scheme is launched
2009
  • Constitutional changes increase regional representation on Council
2010
  • Celebration of LIANZA centenary with publication of A Century of Library Life in Aotearoa – Te Rau Herenga 1910 – 2010.
2011
  • Questions submitted on library and information issues to all political parties prior to General Election for first time
2012
  • The "Strengthening the Profession" projects are launched
2013
  • Inaugural issue of Libraries Aotearoa (a state of the sector report) published
  • Collaboration meeting held between various sector associations
2014
  • Libraries Aotearoa launched
2015
  • Future of Libraries Summit held in Wellington
2017
  • Briefing documents sent to incoming Ministers of Internal Affairs, Culture and Heritage and Education
2019
  • Won bid for IFLA WLIC 2022